WordPlay-recommended Nonfiction

Nonfiction I have loved…

Is it any surprise that I love books?! The honest truth is that, after my mother took me to the library (which was often, bless her!), she let me choose a few from the stack and then hid the rest to dole out so they would last until the next library trip. (Yes, I thought this was quite cruel at the time, but to be fair, it was hard to get me to do anything but read!)

So I am very excited to get to share my favorites — and other WordPlayer’s favorites — with you. You can click on a book and learn more about it on Amazon.com, and/or order it if you like.

I’ll be adding more books  to this page soon, and creating pages for other categories as well. I’d love to hear which books you think WordPlay writers should read. Please share by emailing info@wordplaynow.com.

CLICK ON THE BOOK IMAGE
TO BE TAKEN STRAIGHT TO AMAZON TO PURCHASE,
JUST AS YOU NORMALLY DO.


ANGEL WHISKERS: REFLECTIONS ON LOVING
AND LOSING A FELINE COMPANION
angel-whiskers

“As she did in her previous book about the bond between humans and dogs (Angel Pawprints), Laurel E. Hunt has gathered essays, poems and illustrations that bear witness to the timeless relationship between people and their cats. Contributors to Angel Whiskers: Reflections on Loving and Losing a Feline Companion include Thomas Hardy, Cleveland Amory, Wendy Wasserstein, George Abbee and 28 others, both well-known and not. To help readers grieving over the loss of a favorite feline, Hunt also includes a list of pet-loss resources.”

— From Publishers Weekly


G-DOG AND THE HOMEBOYS

g-dog

“I first met Father Boyle while reporting on a NBC News documentary on the violent gang scene in Los Angeles….

Operating out of the Dolores Mission Catholic Church in the heart of East L.A., Father Boyle was reciting the funeral Mass for murdered teenagers by day and walking the streets by night, offering solace and guidance to the families of what had become a war zone.

His flock was not confined to the walls of the mission or regular attendance at Sunday services. He was a priest at large to young people called Dreamer, Puppet, and Wicked, to gangs called the Clarence Street Locos and Cuatro Flats. He introduced me to young gang members, some as young as twelve, dressed in the uniform of white T-shirts and black, over-sized work pants and also to those who had grown out of the gangs, the older veteranos….

G-dog was their priest, confidante, tough love counselor, advocate and, most all, their friend, the one they could count on to treat them as people, not as statistics or inmates waiting to happen….”

— Tom Brokaw, in the Foreword